Female Undergraduate Enrolment by Province

Newfoundland and Labrador had the highest percentage of female undergraduates (28.2 per cent), while Saskatchewan displayed the lowest percentage of female enrolment in 2017, with only 18.5 per cent in the undergraduate engineering student population. Seven out of the nine provinces considered experienced increases in female undergraduate enrolment from 2016, while eight out of these same nine provinces experienced increases from 2013.

Statistics provided by Engineers Canada.

Total Undergraduate Engineering Enrolment

Undergraduate student enrolment in accredited engineering programs totalled 82,480 in 2017. This is an increase of 14.4 per cent from 2013 and no significant change from 2016 was observed.

If engineering programs seeking accreditation—but not yet accredited—are included in the sum, total undergraduate enrolment rises to 83,953 students. Chart 1.1 illustrates undergraduate enrolment numbers for engineering institutions that consecutively replied to this survey since 2013.

Statistics provided by Engineers Canada.

Female Undergraduate Enrolment by Discipline

The disciplines that presented the highest percentages of female undergraduate enrolment in 2017 were biosystems engineering, environmental engineering, and chemical engineering, with 47.5 per cent, 41.2 per cent, and 39.3 per cent of total enrolment, respectively. Four out of the five disciplines with the highest percentage of females enrolled were also four out of the five disciplines with the least number of undergraduate students enrolled (see Chart 2.2).

The disciplines with the lowest percentages of female undergraduate enrolment were mechanical engineering (14.2 per cent), software engineering (14.6 per cent), and computer engineering (14.8 per cent). While these three disciplines account for 55.1 per cent of the total number of undergraduate students, they only account for 23.5 per cent of the total number of female undergraduate students.

Furthermore, the disciplines that presented the highest growth in the proportion of females from 2016 were chemical engineering and materials or metallurgical engineering, which rose from 36.8 per cent and 31.6 per cent in 2016, to 39.3 per cent and 33.1 per cent in 2017, respectively. Similarly, the disciplines that presented the highest growth in the proportion of females from 2013 were again materials and metallurgical engineering and chemical engineering, which went from 24.5 per cent and 32.8 per cent in 2013, to 33.1 per cent and 39.3 per cent in 2017, respectively.

Statistics provided by Engineers Canada.